der Quantentheorie auf den Atombau: I. Die Grundpostulate der Quantentheorie [On the Application of the Quantum Theory to Atomic Structure: The Basic Postulates of Quantum Theory] (Vol. 13, pp. 117-165) WITH Über Phasenbeziehungen bei den Bohrschen Modellen von Atomen und Molekeln [About Phase Relationships in the Bohr Models of Atoms and Molecules] (Vol. 14. pp. 44-55) in Zeitschrift für Physik 13 & 14 [Two Bound Together], 1923. Niels WITH Born Bohr, M., W. Heisenberg.

der Quantentheorie auf den Atombau: I. Die Grundpostulate der Quantentheorie [On the Application of the Quantum Theory to Atomic Structure: The Basic Postulates of Quantum Theory] (Vol. 13, pp. 117-165) WITH Über Phasenbeziehungen bei den Bohrschen Modellen von Atomen und Molekeln [About Phase Relationships in the Bohr Models of Atoms and Molecules] (Vol. 14. pp. 44-55) in Zeitschrift für Physik 13 & 14 [Two Bound Together], 1923

Berlin: Julius Springer, 1923. 1st Edition. BOUND FIRST EDITION OF BOHR's 1923 EXPLANATION OF THE ENTIRE RANGE OF QUANTUM PHENOMENA USING ONLY HIS TWO POSTULATES: THE EXISTENCE OF STATIONARY STATES AND THE EMISSION OF RADIATION IN TRANSITION BETWEEN TWO STATES. At the paper's conclusion, Bohr summarized the difficulties quantum mechanical theories had in coping with light quanta, coupling, and dispersion, thus setting the stage for the new quantum mechanics of Schrodinger and Heisenberg. Other papers of significance are noted following the Bohr discussion.

As early as 1918, "Bohr had visualized, at least in outline, the whole theory of atomic phenomena. He of course realized that he was still very far from a logically consistent framework wide enough to incorporate both the quantum postulates and those aspects of classical mechanics and electrodynamics that seemed to retain some validity" (DSB). Bohr's intent in this paper was to "expound systematically the problems which have been met in the investigation of atomic structure" (Nielsen, Correspondence Principle, 40).

As Heisenberg would later point out, Bohr (as he did with his correspondence principle) is careful in this paper to postulate a "detailed analogy between the quantum theory and the classical theory appropriate to the mental picture employed. This analogy does not merely serve as a guide to the discovery of formal laws; its special value is that it furnishes the interpretation of the laws that are found in terms of the mental picture used (Heisenberg, Physical Principles, 105).

In the introduction, Bohr made a statement he was to repeat often: "Every description of natural processes must be based on ideas which have been introduced and defined by the classical theory" (Bohr, 117). The paper divides into three chapters: The Stationary States, The Process of Radiation, and On the Formal Nature of the Quantum Theory. Bohr wrote: "We shall try to show that, notwithstanding the uncertainty which the preceding considerations contain, it yet seems possible, even for atoms with several electrons, to characterize their motion in a rational manner by the introduction of quantum numbers… The demand for sharp, stable, stationary states can be referred to in the language of the quantum theory as a general principle of the existence and permanence of the quantum numbers" (Nielsen, 41). Bohr then discusses the issues which neither classical nor the present quantum theory had yet given "adequate account", thereby laying the groundwork for what was to come.

ALSO INCLUDED: "Über Phasenbeziehungen bei den Bohrschen Modellen von Atomen und Molekeln" [About Phase Relationships in the Bohr Models of Atoms and Molecules] (Vol. 14, pp. 44-55). 1st ed. Born & Heisenberg's paper on Bohr's atomic model as a part of Heisenberg's habilitation. ALSO: Han's Kramers "Über das Modell des Heliumatoms" [The Model oft he Helium Atom] (Vol. 13, pp. 312-342). Kramer's application of Bohr's theories to the model of he helium atom. "By failing to obtain agreement with the observed ionization potential, it demonstrated very clearly the inability of classical mechanics, and hence the perturbation theory, to describe accurately the motion of electrons in an atom, even in a stationary state" (Nielsen, 41). Item #1005

CONDITION & DETAILS: Berlin: Julius Springer. 4to. (9 x 6.25 inches; 225 x 156mm). Two volumes bound as one. [vi], 406; [iv], 414, [2]. Tightly bound in blue cloth, gilt-lettered at the spine. Minor rubbing at the edge tips. Bright and clean throughout. Very good condition.

Price: $375.00