Quantentheoretische Beiträge zum Benzolproblem I - III, Volumes 70, 72, and 76, 1931 and 1932 (Quantentheoretische Beiträge zum Benzolproblem I. Die Elektronenkonfiguration des Benzols und verwandter Verbindungen in Zeitschrift für Physik 70, pp. 204-286, 1931 WITH Quanstentheoretische Beiträge zum Benzolproblem II. Quantentheorie der induzierten Polaritäten in Zeitschrift für Physik 72, pp. 310-337, 1931 WITH Quantentheoretische Beiträge zum Problem der aromatischen und ungesättigten Verbindungen III in Zeitschrift für Physik 76, pp. 628-648, 1932). Erich Hückel.

Quantentheoretische Beiträge zum Benzolproblem I - III, Volumes 70, 72, and 76, 1931 and 1932 (Quantentheoretische Beiträge zum Benzolproblem I. Die Elektronenkonfiguration des Benzols und verwandter Verbindungen in Zeitschrift für Physik 70, pp. 204-286, 1931 WITH Quanstentheoretische Beiträge zum Benzolproblem II. Quantentheorie der induzierten Polaritäten in Zeitschrift für Physik 72, pp. 310-337, 1931 WITH Quantentheoretische Beiträge zum Problem der aromatischen und ungesättigten Verbindungen III in Zeitschrift für Physik 76, pp. 628-648, 1932)

Berlin: Julius Springer, 1931. 1st Edition. THREE FULL VOLUMES, 1st EDITIONS OF HÜCKEL'S THREE LONG PAPERS ON THE QUANTUM MECHANICS OF AROMATIC AND UNSATURATED MOLECULES, TOGETHER CONSITUTING THE HÜCKEL METHOD OR HÜCKEL MOLECULAR ORBITAL METHOD (HMO) & PROVIDING "THE FIRST QUANTUM THEORETICAL DESCRIPTION OF BENZENE" (DSB). As a concept, molecular orbital theory " -- a method for determining molecular structure in which electrons are not assigned to individual bonds between atoms but are treated as moving under the influence of the nuclei in the whole molecule" -- was extendable to large molecules of atoms, but Hückel was the first to do so (Wikipedia). Beginning in 1931 and with the first of these papers, Erich Hückel developed an approach that could be used for conjugated systems, [meaning] the electron is considered free to travel throughout the length of a conjugated system" (Allen, Biophysical Chemistry, 276).

The three founders of 20th c. quantum chemistry were Erich Hückel, Friedrich Hund, and Robert S. Mullikan. Hückel studied physics and mathematics in Göttingen and 1929, Bohr suggested that he "should try to apply the modern quantum mechanics to chemical problems, especially the double bonds of carbon. The development of the so-called Hückel molecular orbital theory is regarded as his opus magnum" (Bard, Electrochemical Dictionary 426). Mulliken later referred to the first of Hückel's papers offered here as 'monumental'" (Karachalios, Erich Hückel, 77).

In the first of these papers, "Hückel gave two descriptions of benzene: his first method, which eventually came to be known as the valence bond method, and a second, which involved the application of molecular orbital methods. Hückel believed that the experimental data gave him good reasons for preferring the second approach, which was utilized by John Lennard-Jones, Hund, and Robert Mulliken. This second approach is widely known as the HMO method (Hückel's molecular orbital method)" (DSB).

At its core, Hückel's molecular orbital method (HMO) is a quantum mechanical concept that gives important insight into the properties of large molecules. It is the first MO theory that could be applied to large molecules and has the advantage of being a theory that can be implemented without the aid of a computer. As well, HMO has been the starting been the starting point for more advanced theories, among them, a very successful theoretical interpretation of electronic spectra of conjugated and aromatic hydrocarbons.

ALSO INCLUDED: Vol. 70 includes a paper by Arno Brasch and Fritz Lange, "Experimentell-technische Vorbereitungen" on employing atmospheric electricity as a high voltage source.

ALSO: Vol. 72 includes an important paper by Oskar Klein "Zur quantenmechanischen Begrundung des zweiten Hauptsatzes der Warmelehre" in which he used "his experience in both quantum and statistical mechanics, succeeded in solving the problem of whether the quantum statistics on molecular level can explain how the entropy increases with time in accordance with the second law of thermodynamics" (Leonidovich, 874). "With a most elegant and simple mathematical argument based on a technique developed by Gibbs in 1902, Klein had succeeded in deducing [an explanation of the thermodynamic irreversibility paradoxically generated by mechanically reversible systems. Klein's equation] is often referred to as Klein's inequality or Klein's lemma, as an auxiliary theorem to his derivation of the second law" (Lindstrom, 78).

ALSO: Vol. 76 includes a paper by Herbert Becker and Walther Bothe's "Die in Bor und Beryllium erregten" paper helping to establish whether, in addition to neutrons, penetrating radiation included a gamma ray component. Item #1019

CONDITION: Berlin: Julius Springer. 4to. 3 full volumes, NOT institutional, NO stamps or markings. Uniformally & tightly bound in blue cloth, gilt-lettered spines; minor scuffing at the edge tips. Slight toning throughout. Very good condition.

Price: $500.00