Researches on the Oxymuriatic Acid, Its Nature and Combinations; And on the Elements of the Muriatic Acid. With Some Experiments on Sulphur and Phosphorus, Made in the Laboratory of the Royal Institution (pp. 231-257) in Philosophical Transactions of the Royal Society of London for the year MDCCCX (1810), Part II [Full volume bound with Part I]. Sir Humphry WITH William Herschel Davy, George Pearson, James Macartney, John Brinkley, Stephen Groombridge, T. A. Knight, William T. Brande, Benjamin Gibson, William Henry, Everard Home, Humphry Davy, William Hyde Wollaston.
Researches on the Oxymuriatic Acid, Its Nature and Combinations; And on the Elements of the Muriatic Acid. With Some Experiments on Sulphur and Phosphorus, Made in the Laboratory of the Royal Institution (pp. 231-257) in Philosophical Transactions of the Royal Society of London for the year MDCCCX (1810), Part II [Full volume bound with Part I]
Researches on the Oxymuriatic Acid, Its Nature and Combinations; And on the Elements of the Muriatic Acid. With Some Experiments on Sulphur and Phosphorus, Made in the Laboratory of the Royal Institution (pp. 231-257) in Philosophical Transactions of the Royal Society of London for the year MDCCCX (1810), Part II [Full volume bound with Part I]

Researches on the Oxymuriatic Acid, Its Nature and Combinations; And on the Elements of the Muriatic Acid. With Some Experiments on Sulphur and Phosphorus, Made in the Laboratory of the Royal Institution (pp. 231-257) in Philosophical Transactions of the Royal Society of London for the year MDCCCX (1810), Part II [Full volume bound with Part I]

London: W. Bulmer, 1810. 1st Edition. FIRST EDITION, BOUND FULL VOLUME of the Philosophical Transactions of the Royal Society of London for the Year MDCCCX (1810), PARTS I & II, complete with 15 plates. Among the many papers included is Sir Humphry Davy’s announcement of the “discovery” of the new element chlorine (American Chemistry Council).

Chlorine was unwittingly first produced by a Swedish pharmacist, Carl Wilhem Scheele after he dropped hydrochloric acid onto manganese dioxide and a greenish-yellow gas was produced. In accordance with the conclusions of Antoine Lavoisier, chemists then believed that acids were oxygen-based. For this reason, the gas Scheele produced was believed to be a compound of oxygen, then thought to be “a constituent of all acids” (Dictionary of Scientific Biography III, 602). Lavoisier, Gay-Lussac, Thenard, and Davy were all studying oxygen. But it was Davy’s investigation of the compound hydrochloric acid, published in this paper, that first demonstrated that the compound contained no oxygen – meaning that Scheele had accidentally produced an element. Sir Humphry Davy chose to name the element chloric gas, or chlorine, basing it on the Greek word for its color, khloros (ACC).

Part I of the volume also includes:

I. The Croonian Lecture, by William Hyde Wollaston

II. The Bakerian Lecture for 1809. On some new electrochemical researches, on various objects, particularly the metallic bodies, from the alkalies, and earths, and on some combinations of hydrogene, by Humphry Davy

III. The case of a man, who died in consequence of the bite of a rattle-snake; with an account of the effects produced by the poison by Everard Home

IV. An analysis of several varieties of British and Foreign Salt, (muriate of Soda) with a view to explain their fitness for different economical purposes by William Henry

V. Description of an extraordinary human fætus, by Mr. Benj Gibson

VI. Observations on the Effects of Magnesia, in Preventing an Increased Formation of Uric Acid; With Some Remarks on the Composition of the Urine by William T. Brande

[Meteorological Journal pp. 1-26]

Part II includes:

VII. Supplement to the first and second part of the paper of experiments, for investigating the cause of coloured con¬centric rings between object glasses, and other appearances of a similar nature, by William Herschel

VIII. On the parts of trees primarily impaired by age, by T. A. Knight

IX. On the gizzards of grazing birds, by Everard Home

X. Observations on atmospherical refraction as it affects astro¬nomical observations; in a letter from S. Groombridge, Esq. to the Rev. Nevil Maskelyne, D.D. F. R. S. Astronomer Royal. Communicated by the Astronomer Royal, by Stephen Groombridge

XI. Extract of a letter from the Rev. John Brinkley, D. D. F. R. S. Andrew's Professor of Astronomy in the University of Dublin, to the Rev. Nevil Maskelyne, D. D. F. R. S. Astro¬nomer Royal, on the annual Parallax of Lyræ, John Brinkley

XII. On the mode of breeding of the oviviviparous shark, and on the aeration of the fœtal blood in different classes of animals, by Everard Home

XIII. On cystic oxide, a new species of urinary calculus, by William Hyde Wollaston

XIV. Researches on the oxymuriatic acid, its nature and combinations; and on the elements of the muriatic acid. With some experiments on sulphur and phosphorus, made in the laboratory of the Royal Institution, Humphry Davy

XV. Observations upon luminous animals, James Macartney and Everard Home

XVI. Observations and experiments on pus, George Pearson. Item #1153

CONDITION & DETAILS: London: W. Bulmer. 4to. Two small library stamps, one on each title page. Tightly bound in half-calf over marbled paper; with some scuffing and rubbing at the edges; some chipping to spine calf. Four raised bands on the spine. Three morocco spine labels, title, volume, and date. The endpapers are foxed but the volume is otherwise bright and exceptionally clean throughout. Very good.

Price: $500.00