Physical Principles Involved in Transistor Action in Bell System Technical Journal 28, no. 2 (April 1949), pp. 239-77 [Complete issue in original wraps]. J. Bardeen, W. H. Brattain, John, Walter.

Physical Principles Involved in Transistor Action in Bell System Technical Journal 28, no. 2 (April 1949), pp. 239-77 [Complete issue in original wraps]

New York: American Telephone and Telegraph Company, 1949. 1st Edition. FIRST EDITION IN ORIGINAL WRAPS OF “THE FIRST COMPREHENSIVE REPORT ON THE INVENTION OF THE TRANSISTOR” -- probably the most important invention of the 20th century -- by BARDEEN & BRATTAIN (Origins of Cyberspace, 450; Ira Flatow). Their discovery had been “announced in three brief papers [letters to the editor] published in the Physical Review the previous year” (ibid). It was not until the publication of paper offered here that Bell Labs allowed Bardeen and Brattain to fully describe their invention. “The transistor gradually replaced the bulkier vacuum tube, allowing heat reduction and miniaturization of electronic devices. Transistors began to be employed on a large scale in computer manufacturing in the late 1950s; they were eventually miniaturized and incorporated into microprocessors” (ibid).

Together with William Shockley, Bardeen and Brattain received the Nobel Prize in Physics, 1956, for this work, specifically, for their investigations of semiconductors (the materials of which transistors are made) and for their discovery of the transistor (Nobel Prize Committee).

"In 1947, John Bardeen and Walter Brattain, working at Bell Telephone Laboratories, were trying to understand the nature of the electrons at the interface between a metal and a semiconductor. They realized that by making two point contacts very close to one another, they could make a three terminal device - the first "point contact" transistor” (Nobel Prize Portal).

They quickly made a few of these transistors and connected them with some other components to make an audio amplifier. This audio amplifier was shown to chief executives at Bell Telephone Company, who were very impressed that it didn't need time to "warm up" (like the heaters in vacuum tube circuits). They immediately realized the power of this new technology. The invention of the transistor was the spark that ignited a huge research effort in solid state electronics and is often considered the invention that made the information age possible. Item #1194

CONDITION & DETAILS: New York: American Telephone and Telegraph Company. Complete issue. First edition, original printed wraps. Very small tear at the bottom of the front wrap; barely visible, see picture. Fine condition by any measure.

Price: $1,600.00