The Wonders That Await a Micro-Microscope (The Saturday Review pp. 45–47, April 2, 1960) WITH There’s Plenty of Room at the Bottom (Miniaturization pp. 282-296, 1961) WITH Infinitesimal Machinery (Nanotechnology: Science, Innovation, and Opportunity pp. 247-268, 2006). [FEYNMAN’S PIONEERING WORKS ON NANOTECHNOLOGY]. Richard Feynman.

The Wonders That Await a Micro-Microscope (The Saturday Review pp. 45–47, April 2, 1960) WITH There’s Plenty of Room at the Bottom (Miniaturization pp. 282-296, 1961) WITH Infinitesimal Machinery (Nanotechnology: Science, Innovation, and Opportunity pp. 247-268, 2006). [FEYNMAN’S PIONEERING WORKS ON NANOTECHNOLOGY]

1st Edition. FEYNMAN’S PIONEERING WORKS ON NANOTECHNOLOGY, 3 WORKS HOUSED IN A CUSTOM MADE CASE. Richard Feynman created the science of nanotechnology in his December 1959 speech at the American Physical Society and made further statements about the science in a February 1983 speech at Jet Propulsion Laboratories. The case contains a summary (in the Saturday Review issue in original wraps) and a transcript of Feynman’s first speech (in a book entitled Miniaturization) and a transcript of his second (in a book entitled Nanotechnology: Science, Innovation, and Opportunity.) The transcripts published in both books had only been published once prior to this, one in Caltech’s magazine Engineering and Science and the second in the Journal of Microelectromechanical Systems.

In December of 1959, Richard Feynman gave a talk called “There’s Plenty of Room at the Bottom” at an annual meeting of the American Physical Society at Caltech. In this famous lecture, Feynman laid the conceptual foundations for the field now called nanotechnology when he imagined a day when things could be miniaturized -- when huge amounts of information could be encoded onto increasingly small spaces, and when machinery could be made considerably smaller and more compact. He asked his audience:

“I don't know how to do this on a small scale in a practical way, but I do know that computing machines are very large; they fill rooms. Why can't we make them very small, make them of little wires, little elements, and by little, I mean little?’” (“Richard Feynman Introduces the World to Nanotechnology with Two Seminal Lectures in Physics, Technology, April 23rd, 2013). A summary of and a transcript of this lecture is included in this offering. The second of the lectures was given in 1983 and is considered a sequel to that given in 1959; as with the latter, a transcript of the lecture is included.

The lecture is remarkable. In it, Feynman anticipates “the sacrificial method of making silicon micromotors, the use of electrostatic actuation, and the importance of friction and contact sticking in such devices. He explores the persistent problem of finding meaningful applications for these tiny machines, touching a range of topics along the way. And he looks at the future of computation using a register made of atoms, and quantum-mechanical transitions for computation operations” (Journal of Microelectromechanical Systems, Vol. 2, No. 1, March 1993). Item #1290

CONDITION & DETAILS: The Saturday Review issue has an address sticker on the front wrapper; otherwise fine. The two volumes are in fine condition with original dust wrappers. The 1961 volume is signed by the author. The custom case is pristine and is gilt-lettered on both the front board and the spine.

Price: $575.00