Prediction and Entropy of Printed English in The Bell System Technical Journal 30 No. 1 pp. 50-64, January 1951 [ORIGINAL WRAPPERS WITH CUSTOM CASE, REDUNDANCY & ENTROPY IN THE ENGLISH LANGUAGE]. Claude Shannon.

Prediction and Entropy of Printed English in The Bell System Technical Journal 30 No. 1 pp. 50-64, January 1951 [ORIGINAL WRAPPERS WITH CUSTOM CASE, REDUNDANCY & ENTROPY IN THE ENGLISH LANGUAGE]

New York: American Telephone and Telegraph Company. 1951. 1st Edition. FIRST EDITION IN PAPER WRAPS OF SHANNON’S 1951 FAMOUS WORK ON COMPUTATIONAL LINGUISTICS.

In 1948, Shannon founded the field of information theory by defining the once fuzzy concept of ‘information’ ) as it relates to communication engineers) in a precise way that allowed it to be quantified; in his theory, the fundamental unit of information is the bit. In this derivation, "information, defined intuitively and informally, might be something like ‘uncertainty’s antidote.’ [And this] turns out to be the formal definition – the amount of information comes from the amount by which something reduces uncertainty” (Christian, The Most Human Human, 226).

When Shannon derived his 1948 “equation for the amount of information… [he] found that it was identical to the formula that physicists use to calculate the quantity known as entropy in thermodynamics (Rogers and Valente, A History of Information Theory, 39-45). In the wake of that work and in the paper offered here, Shannon discusses the information equivalent of mass, arguing “the higher the entropy, the more information there is” (ibid). This then becomes known as ‘information entropy,’ or Shannon entropy,’ or just ‘entropy.’

In this 1951 paper, “A new method of estimating the entropy and redundancy of a language is described. This method exploits the knowledge of the language statistics possessed by those who speak the language, and depends on experimental results in prediction of the next letter when the preceding text is known. Results of experiments in prediction are given, and some properties of an ideal predictor are developed” (Shannon, 1951, 50).

An American mathematician and engineer, Claude Shannon is most often connected to the sampling theorem which bears his name. “Shannon is considered the father of information theory, which laid the foundation for digital communications and source compression, and ultimately, the information society as we know it” (Vetterli, Signal Processing, 498). Item #1422

CONDITION & DETAILS: New York: American Telephone and Telegraph Company. 8vo. Complete in original paper wrappers, library stamp on toned front wrapper, spine repaired. Internally pristine – bright and very clean. The issue is housed in a custom-made blue cloth clamshell case, gilt-lettered at the spine.

Price: $300.00