On the Influence of Magnetisation on the Nature of the Light Emitted by a Substance in The London, Edinburgh, and Dublin Philosophical Magazine and Journal of Science, 43, 1897, pp. 226-239. Pieter Zeeman.

On the Influence of Magnetisation on the Nature of the Light Emitted by a Substance in The London, Edinburgh, and Dublin Philosophical Magazine and Journal of Science, 43, 1897, pp. 226-239

London: Taylor and Francis, 1897. 1st Edition. FIRST ENGLISH EDITION OF THE NOBLE PRIZE WINNING DISCOVERY AND ANNOUNCEMENT OF THE ZEEMAN EFFECT: THE SPLITTING OF A SPECTRAL LINE INTO COMPLICATED MULTIPLE PATTERNS WHEN IN THE PRESENCE OF A STATIC MAGNETIC FIELD. Also included is Zeeman’s appendix. This paper was delivered at the October, 1896 meeting of the Royal Netherlands Academy of Arts and Sciences in Amsterdam. NOTE that we separately offer Zeeman’s 1896 German publication of this paper as well.

Pieter Zeeman (1865 – 1943) was a Dutch physicist who shared the 1902 Nobel Prize in Physics with Hendrik Lorentz for his discovery of the Zeeman effect. "The Zeeman effect not only opened a new world of facts which interest the physicist, the chemist, and even the astronomer, but the study also contributed - to an extent much greater than the study of the Stark effect - to the conceptual development of quantum theory" (Jammer). “In 1896, at the request of Lorentz, [Zeeman] began investigating the effect of magnetic fields on a light source and discovered what is now known as the Zeeman effect. This discovery proved Lorentz theory of electromagnetic radiation… It is by way of the Zeeman Effect that astronomers cam measure the strength of the magnetic field on the surface of the sun, or other stars. Scientists were not able to fully understand the Effect until the development of quantum mechanics in the 1920s. In 1902, Zeeman and Lorentz were jointly awarded the Nobel Prize in Physics, for their research into the influence of magnetism upon radiation phenomenon” (Pieter Zeeman Website).

Today, the Zeeman Effect is one of the principles that underlie nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy, electron spin resonance spectroscopy, magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and Mossbauer spectroscopy.

ALSO INCLUDED: Rutherford’s “On the Electrification of Gases exposed to Rontgen Rays, and the Absorption of Rontgen Radiation by Gases and Vapours, pp. 241-255. Item #1484

CONDITION & DETAILS: London: Taylor & Francis. (8.5 x 5.5 inches; 213 x 138mm). One small stamp on the first page. Complete. [VII], 468, [4]. Three plates and in-text illustrations throughout. Handsomely rebound in period style three quarter calf. Gilt-ruled and raised bands at the spine. Gilt-lettered red and black morocco spine labels. The title page and the last few pages of the index are fingered, otherwise clean and very bright throughout.

Price: $500.00

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