Net Transfer of Carbon Between Ectomycorrhizal Tree Species in the Field, Nature, Volume 388, Issue 6642, August 7, 1997, pp. 579-582 [FIRST EDITION IN ORIGINAL WRAPPERS OF GROUND-BREAKING RESEARCH PROVING THAT TREES COMMUNICATE WITH EACH OTHER]. Suzanne W. Simard, David A. Perry.

Net Transfer of Carbon Between Ectomycorrhizal Tree Species in the Field, Nature, Volume 388, Issue 6642, August 7, 1997, pp. 579-582 [FIRST EDITION IN ORIGINAL WRAPPERS OF GROUND-BREAKING RESEARCH PROVING THAT TREES COMMUNICATE WITH EACH OTHER]

London: 1997. 1st Edition. FIRST EDITION IN ORIGINAL PAPER WRAPS OF SUZANNE SIMARD’S SEMINAL DISCOVERY THAT TREES ‘TALK’ TO EACH OTHER – that complex, symbiotic networks in our forests facilitate communication and cooperation among trees; in other words, trees use fungal networks to nourish and communicate with each other. Simard, with this one work, changed everything then understood about forests. Her research, then and since, has (together with that of others) fully supported her argument.

This paper was Simard’s PhD thesis, but it was not only deemed important enough to publish in Nature, the journal put Simard’s work on the cover – calling it “The Wood-Wide Web” – a phrase that remains in use. Simard thesis revealed that Douglas fir and paper birch trees were using mycelial networks to send carbon to each other. She wrote: “Plants within communities can be interconnected and exchange resources through a common hyphal network and form guilds based on their shared mycorrhizal associates. Consequently, the theory that plant community dynamics operate mainly within the constraints of resource supply should be reformulated to consider mutualism between plants and their mycorrhizal fungi, as well as microbially mediated resource sharing” (Simard, p. 579).

“Simard’s main focus is on the below-ground fungal networks that connect trees and facilitate underground inter-tree communication and interaction. Her team's analysis revealed that the fungi networks move water, carbon and nutrients such as nitrogen between and among trees as well as across species. The research has demonstrated that these complex, symbiotic networks in our forests -- at the hub of which stand what she calls the "mother trees" -- mimic our own neural and social networks.

“[Her][ groundbreaking work on symbiotic plant communication has far-reaching implications in both the forestry and agricultural industries, in particular concerning sustainable stewardship of forests and the plant’s resistance to pathogens” (TedTalk 6.2016). As well, the idea that trees use underground fungal networks to not simply communicate, but to share resources, has called into question the core tenets of Darwinian evolution -- that nature constantly competes for survival.

Suzanne Simard is a Professor of Forest Ecology in the Department of Forest and Conservation Sciences at the University of British Columbia, where she teaches courses in forest and soil ecology While she works primarily in forests, but also grasslands, wetlands, tundra and alpine ecosystems” (TT). Item #1549

CONDITION & DETAILS: Original wraps. 4to. Mailing label on front wrap. Bright and very clean inside and out. Fine condition.

Price: $490.00