Design Objectives for the IBM Stretch Computer in Proceedings of the Eastern Joint Computer Conference, pp. 20-22, December 10-12, 1956 [IBM'S FIRST TRANSISTORIZED SUPERCOMPUTER]

New York: American Institute of Electrical Engineers, 1956. 1st Edition. FIRST EDITION IN ORIGINAL WRAPS OF AN EARLY PAPER ON THE IBM 7030, ALSO KNOWN AS STRETCH, WAS IBM'S FIRST TRANSISTORIZED SUPERCOMPUTER.

In 1958, two years after the publication of this paper, "Design Objectives for the IBM Stretch Computer,” Dunwell “became the director of Project STRETCH, the stretching of transistor technology for both commercial and scientific applications” (History Computer Web Portal). “The realization of the computer [he described in this paper] called for high-frequency circuits capable of passing a signal through five sequential logical stages in 100 millimicroseconds. At the start of the project a study of available devices and techniques indicated that this goal would be difficult to reach without significant improvements either in the devices or the circuits, or both. Such an improvement came about in the device area with the availability of drift type transistors for research work. The characteristics of these transistors made necessary a new approach to circuit design which has resulted in circuits which not only meet the speed requirements, but also are relatively simple, reliable, and insensitive to noise” (ACM).

The project had three objectives: (1) provide components for commercial transistorized computers, (2) combine in one machine both scientific and commercial capabilities, and (3) establish the ground rules for the design of future IBM computers. Among the 22 ground rules so established were the 8-bit byte, a standard interface to peripheral equipment, and automatic error correction” (History Computer Web Portal).

ALSO INCLUDED AMONG THE MANY OTHER PAPERS IN THIS ISSUE: "High-Speed Transistor computer Circuit Design" by R. A. Henle (pp. 64-66). Item #1588

CONDITION & DETAILS: Complete issue in original wraps. 8vo. (9 x 7.5 inches). Handwritten name and stamp of F. M. Verzuh on the front wrap. Frank M. Verzuh was a research assistant, research associate, and Instructor at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology (MIT)… In 1950 he became Director of Statistical Services and set up computing equipment to automate solutions to administrative and scientific problems within MIT. From 1956 to 1960, Verzuh was assistant director of the MIT Computation Center, concurrently serving as Director of Operations of the IBM 704 EDP machine. Some sunning at the edges of the wraps as well as an ink mark on the spine. Wraps are tight and solid and the interior is pristine.

Price: $65.00