The Effect of Magnetisation on the Nature of the Light Emitted by a Substance, in Nature, Vol. 55, 1897. Pieter Zeeman.
The Effect of Magnetisation on the Nature of the Light Emitted by a Substance, in Nature, Vol. 55, 1897.

The Effect of Magnetisation on the Nature of the Light Emitted by a Substance, in Nature, Vol. 55, 1897.

London: Macmillan, 1897. 1st Edition. FIRST EDITION, FULL VOLUME, OF THE 1st ENGLISH TRANSLATION OF ONE OF THE MOST SIGNIFICANT AND INFLUENTIAL DISCOVERIES OF THE LATE 19th CENTURY, the Noble Prize winning discovery and announcement of the Zeeman effect: the splitting of a spectral line into complicated multiple patterns when in the presence of a static magnetic field.

"The Zeeman effect not only opened a new world of facts which interest the physicist, the chemist, and even the astronomer, but the study also contributed - to an extent much greater than the study of the Stark effect - to the conceptual development of quantum theory" (Jammer). "In 1896, at the request of Lorentz, [Zeeman] began investigating the effect of magnetic fields on a light source and discovered what is now known as the Zeeman effect. This discovery proved Lorentz theory of electromagnetic radiation… It is by way of the Zeeman Effect that astronomers cam measure the strength of the magnetic field on the surface of the sun, or other stars. Scientists were not able to fully understand the Effect until the development of quantum mechanics in the 1920s. In 1902, Zeeman and Lorentz were jointly awarded the Nobel Prize in Physics, for their research into the influence of magnetism upon radiation phenomenon” (Pieter Zeeman Website).

Today, the Zeeman Effect is one of the principles that underlie nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy, electron spin resonance spectroscopy, magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and Mossbauer spectroscopy. Zeeman's paper was first presented to the Royal Academy of Sciences in Amsterdam in a paper entitled "Over den Invloed eener Magnetisatie op den Aard van het door een Stof uitgezonden Licht" in 1896. The 1896 original and this first English translation includes his Zeeman's understanding of "small molecular elements charged with electricity," and a rough calculation of the charge to mass ratio of these ions" (Nature Physics Portal).

In 1902, Zeeman and Lorenz were awarded the Nobel Prize in Physics for "the extraordinary service they rendered by their researches into the influence of magnetism upon radiation phenomena" (Nobel Prize Portal). Item #218

CONDITION & DETAILS: London: Macmillan and Co., Volume 55 (November 1896-April 1897). 4to (10.5 x 8 inches; 263 x 200mm). Complete. Ex-libris bearing only a small stamp on the half title and no spine markings whatsoever. Beautifully rebound in recent dark orange cloth designed to replicate Nature bindings. The front board is ruled and lettered in black. The spine is also black ruled and lettered, with the volume number and date in gilt. Tightly and very solidly bound. New endpapers. Light age toning in the upper margin of some pages, as well as to the title. An occasional light age spot here and there. Otherwise bright and very clean throughout. Very good condition.

Price: $600.00