On the Calorific Effects of Magneto-Electricity, and the Mechanical Value of Heat in The London, Edinburgh, and Dublin Philosophical Magazine and Journal of Science 23, 1843, pp. 263-276; 347-355; and 435-443. Joule, James Prescott.

On the Calorific Effects of Magneto-Electricity, and the Mechanical Value of Heat in The London, Edinburgh, and Dublin Philosophical Magazine and Journal of Science 23, 1843, pp. 263-276; 347-355; and 435-443

1843. 1st Edition. FIRST EDITION OF THE DISCOVERY AND DEMONSTRATION OF THE EQUIVALENCE OF HEAT AND ENERGY; all three parts of this paper are present in this volume. In this 1843 paper, a greatly expanded version of a presentation he gave before the British Association earlier in that year, Joule clearly states that heat is a form of energy and that motion and heat are mutually interchangeable. Building upon the work of Rumford and Thompson, Joule shows that the heating effect he had quantified in 1841 was due to generation of heat in the conductor and not its transfer from another part of the equipment. His paper provided "experimental proof of the mechanical equivalent of heat for physical phenomena" and "was fundamental to the establishment of the principle of the conservation of energy" (PMM, p. 196); Norman 1143). Here "Joule noted the relationship between the amount of heat generated by an electric current in a conductor and the resistance of the conductor, and the creation of heat when water was forced through narrow tubes or through a paddle wheel" (Norman). "Causing the potential energy of a raised weight to be used up in turning a paddle which generated heat by stirring water in a vessel, and observing the rise of temperature so produced, Joule found that 772 foot-pounds of work served to heat one pound of water through one degree (Fahrenheit) on the thermometer he employed, at a particular part of the scale" (Thermodynamics of Engineers, 10). From this Joule concluded that heat was a form of energy; still further, he was able to calculate that in any given system, the sum total of energy was constant and convertible" (Norman 1143). Joule called the amount of work (in foot-pounds) required to create a unit of heat 'the mechanical equivalent of heat' and argued that because motion and heat were mutually interchangeable, in every single case, a given amount of work would generate the same amount of heat (assuming the work rendered is completely converted to heat energy). Item #398

CONDITION & DETAILS: London: Taylor & Francis. (8.5 x 5.5 inches; 213 x 138mm). Complete. [4], viii, [552], 4. One plate and in-text illustrations throughout. Handsomely, solidly, and tightly rebound in three quarter brown calf over marbled paper boards. Tightly bound; gilt-ruled raised bands at the spine. Gilt-lettered red and black morocco spine labels. Slight toning to the preliminaries, otherwise bright and very clean thoughout. Near fine condition.

Price: $3,250.00