Diatomic Molecules According to the Wave Mechanics. II Vibrational Levels, The Physical Review, Volume 34, 1, July 1, 1929, pp. 57-65 [ORIGINAL WRAPPERS]. Philip M. Morse.
Diatomic Molecules According to the Wave Mechanics. II Vibrational Levels, The Physical Review, Volume 34, 1, July 1, 1929, pp. 57-65 [ORIGINAL WRAPPERS]

Diatomic Molecules According to the Wave Mechanics. II Vibrational Levels, The Physical Review, Volume 34, 1, July 1, 1929, pp. 57-65 [ORIGINAL WRAPPERS]

Minneapolis: American Physical Society, 1929. 1st Edition. FIRST EDITION IN ORIGINAL WRAPS OF THE MORSE POTENTIAL, “a convenient interatomic interaction model for the potential energy of a diatomic molecule. It is a better approximation for the vibrational structure of the molecule than the QHO (quantum harmonic oscillator) because it explicitly includes the effects of bond breaking, such as the existence of unbound states. It also accounts for the anharmonicity of real bonds and the non-zero transition probability for overtone and combination bands. The Morse potential can also be used to model other interactions such as the interaction between an atom and a surface… Its mathematical form inspired the MLR (Morse/Long-range) potential, which is the most popular potential energy function used for fitting spectroscopic data” (Wikipedia).

ALSO INCLUDED IN THIS VOLUME: Robertson, H. P., “The Uncertainty Principle” in The Physical Review 34, 1, July 1, 1929, pp. 163-164. FIRST EDITION IN ORIGINAL WRAPS OF A SEMINAL MODIFICATION OF THE HEISENBERG UNCERTAINTY PRINCIPLE. It is one of the most important and “common general form of the uncertainty principle” and is known as “the Robertson uncertainty relation” (Wikipedia).

Werner Heisenberg’s uncertainty principle is, at its core, the principle that the momentum and position of a particle cannot both be precisely determined at the same time. It stands at the heart of quantum mechanics. Heisenberg’s work was “quickly taken up, discussed, and sought to be extended or modified by many physicists” (Kraugh: Quantum Generations, p. 208). Kennard all but immediately built upon Heisenberg’s work with his mathematically correct derivation of the inequality formula for uncertainty position and momentum. From there [and in this paper], the American physicist Howard Percy Robertson was able to generalize Kennard’s formula for measures other than position and momentum – in other words, Robertson generalized the formula to any pair of observables in any state. Item #561

CONDITION & DETAILS: Minneapolis: American Physical Society. 4to (10 x 7 inches; 250 x 175mm). Original paper wraps. Complete. Minor rubbing at the edge tips; very slight surface spotting to the wraps; professionally repaired closed tear on the rear wrap and the last five pages – all genuinely unobtrusive.

Price: $600.00