Error Detecting and Error Correcting Codes AND Memory Requirements in a Telephone Exchange (Shannon) AND Theory of Relation Between Hole Concentration and Characteristics of Germanium Point Contacts (Bardeen) in The Bell System Technical Journal, Vol. 29, 1950 pp. 147-160, pp. 343-349, pp. 469-497. New York: American Telephone and Telegraph, 1950. R. W. WITH Claude E. Shannon Hamming, J. Bardeen.

Error Detecting and Error Correcting Codes AND Memory Requirements in a Telephone Exchange (Shannon) AND Theory of Relation Between Hole Concentration and Characteristics of Germanium Point Contacts (Bardeen) in The Bell System Technical Journal, Vol. 29, 1950 pp. 147-160, pp. 343-349, pp. 469-497. New York: American Telephone and Telegraph, 1950

New York: American Telephone and Telegraph Co, 1950. 1st Edition. FIRST EDITION, FULL VOLUME IN FINE CONDITION OF HAMMING’S SEMINAL ERROR DETECTING & CORRECTING CODES PAPERS; Hamming’s method corrects single errors within blocks of transmitted data and is also capable of simultaneously detecting when two errors occur. “He further showed that, in a mathematical sense, these error correcting codes are the best possible codes [known also as ‘perfect codes’; there are none shorter” (A. M. Turing Award Portal). The clarity of Hamming’s thinking and methodology led to this paper, a work that soon created an entirely new field within information theory. Hamming was awarded the A. M. Turing Award in 1968.

Richard Wesley Hamming (1915-1998) was an American mathematician whose work had profound and lasting implications for computing and telecommunications. After working on the Manhattan Project, Hamming accepted a position at the Bell Telephone Laboratories in New Jersey.

“Hamming was the first coding theorist to attract widespread interest in his work” (Hook & Norman "Origins of Cyberspace" 646). “It was an event in 1947 that prompted Hamming to undertake his most famous piece of work. One Friday, while working for Bell Laboratories, he set their pre-computer calculating machines to solving a complex problem and expected the result to be waiting for him when he began work on the following Monday. But when he arrived on Monday, he found that an error had occurred early on in the calculations and the relay-based calculators had been unable to proceed” (Turing Award Portal).

Frustrated, “Hamming began developing the first error-correction codes (now known as Hamming codes), which enabled computers to find and correct single errors. Error correction has since been developed into a scientific discipline used in everything from extracting data transmitted from space probes, to recovering jammed communications, to guaranteeing high-quality music from a compact disk” (Hook & Norman). Simple parity codes, by contrast, are unable to correct errors and at best can detect only an odd number of bits in error.

ALSO INCLUDED In discussing the memory requirements of a telephone exchange. Shannon derived a "separate memory" formula, M + 2S log N, which he interpreted in terms of information theory. (Hook & Norman "Origins of Cyberspace 883). The B-C-S theory of superconductivity by Bardeen Cooper & Schreiffer, was successful in explaining the properties of superconductive materials. This work won them the Nobel Prize in Physics (1972) for "Their jointly developed theory of superconductivity, usually called the BCS Theory" Item #796

CONDITION & DETAILS: New York: American Telephone and Telegraph Company. Complete. 8vo. (9.25 x 6; 231 x 150mm). Tightly and solidly hardbound in blue cloth with gilt-lettered black spine label. Bright and very clean inside and out. Near fine condition.

Price: $400.00