Remarks on the Evolution of the Expanding Universe in Physical Review 75 No. 7 April 1, 1949, pp. 1089–1095. Ralph Alpher, Robert Herman.

Remarks on the Evolution of the Expanding Universe in Physical Review 75 No. 7 April 1, 1949, pp. 1089–1095

Lancaster: The American Physical Society, 1949. 1st Edition. FIRST EDITION IN ORIGINAL WRAPS OF THE PREDICTION BY ALPHER & HERMAN OF THE TEMPERATURE OF COSMIC MICROWAVE BACKGROUND RADIATION (CMB) TO BE 5 DEGREES K.

In Big Bang cosmology, CMB is the thermal radiation left over from the time of recombination. Erik M. Leitch of the University of Chicago defines it as the “faint glow of light that fills the universe, falling on Earth from every direction with nearly uniform intensity. It is the residual heat of creation--the afterglow of the big bang--streaming through space these last 14 billion years like the heat from a sun-warmed rock, reradiated at night” (Leitch, What is CMB?, Scientific American Web Portal 13 October, 2003).

“A primordial relic radiation from a hot early beginning of the universe was first predicted by George Gamow in 1948 and by his students Ralph Alpher and Robert Herman in 1949. Gamow made calculations of the conditions in the early stage of the universe and understood that the universe had to have a very hot beginning to prevent the coalescence of all hydrogen nuclei into heavier elements.

In a story related by Hawking, the often humorous Gamow convinced Hans Bethe to coauthor a paper in 1949 with Gamow’s student Ralph Alpher whereby the authors would be cited as Alpher, Bethe and Gamow so that the first letters of each author would coincide with the familiar names of the ‘alpha, beta and gamma’ radiations, which would be most appropriate for a paper on the beginnings of the universe. In their theory they predicted a very hot and dense beginning of the universe, which today with the expanding universe would exhibit a residual photon radiation corresponding to a temperature that would have reduced to only a few degrees above absolute zero of the thermodynamic temperature Kelvin. Alpher and Herman [in this paper] followed the temperature evolution of the early beginning of the universe and predicted a cooling down to a current temperature of 5 K” (L’Annunziata, Radioactivity, 414). Item #818

CONDITION & DETAILS: Lancaster: The American Physical Society. Complete issue in original wraps. 4to (10 x 7.5 inches; 250 x 188mm). Professionally re-backed at the spine. Bright and very clean inside and out. Near fine condition.

Price: $400.00