Gabor, D. [Dennis] WITH Berriman, R. W. WITH Herz, R. H. A New Microscopic Principle [Gabor, pp. 777-778] WITH Electron Tracks in Photographic Emulsions [Berriman p. 432] WITH Electron Tracks in Photographic Emulsions [Herz, pp. 928-929] in Nature, Volume 161, 1948. D. WITH Berriman Gabor, R. H., R. W. WITH Herz, Dennis.
Gabor, D. [Dennis] WITH Berriman, R. W. WITH Herz, R. H. A New Microscopic Principle [Gabor, pp. 777-778] WITH Electron Tracks in Photographic Emulsions [Berriman p. 432] WITH Electron Tracks in Photographic Emulsions [Herz, pp. 928-929] in Nature, Volume 161, 1948

Gabor, D. [Dennis] WITH Berriman, R. W. WITH Herz, R. H. A New Microscopic Principle [Gabor, pp. 777-778] WITH Electron Tracks in Photographic Emulsions [Berriman p. 432] WITH Electron Tracks in Photographic Emulsions [Herz, pp. 928-929] in Nature, Volume 161, 1948

London: Macmillan and Co., 1948. 1st Edition. BOUND FIRST EDITION OF THREE SIGNIFICANT PAPERS:

(1) GABOR PAPER: Gabor’s initial announcement of the “invention and development of the holographic method”; at that time, he called his new technology an ‘electron interference microscope’ (Nobel Prize; Gabor, Nature, 161, 1948, p. 778). “The first public indication of Gabor’s success came with a preliminary note [this paper] to Nature [in 1948]. The following year he wrote a more complete theoretical treatment [which we offer separately] in which he introduced the word ‘hologram’ and indicated possible applications in light optics. Among these was the ability, using the same method, to record the data associated with 3-D objects in one interference object” (Dictionary of Scientific Biography, Sup., 17, 325).

(2) BERRIMAN’S PAPER: First presentation of a “photographic emulsion which can record the track of any charged particle, regardless of its specific ionization, was achieved by [R. W.] Berriman in 1948. This marked the culmination of decisive advances” undertaken by Berriman, the chief emulsion chemist of Kodak Laboratories, Harrow, England (Creutz, Nuclear Instrumentation, 1). This important paper was the result of a charge to Berriman’s Kodak laboratory by the Cabinet Advisory Committee on Atomic Energy; Kodak was charged with the development of a new series of emulsions called ‘Nuclear Research Emulsions’. “The climax came in 1948 when Kodak produced the first emulsion [announced in this paper], NT4, which is sensitive to electrons at minimum ionization and thus capable of recording any charged particle of any energy” (ibid).

(3) HERZ’S PAPER: [R. H.] Herz’s paper, also titled “Electron Tracks in Photographic Emulsions” presents still more detail on Berriman’s discovery. Herz worked alongside Berriman and the two would go on to author other papers together. Further photographs and records of electron tracks in radioactive decay are included. Item #925

CONDITION & DETAILS: London: Macmillan and Son. Complete volume. 4to. (250 x 175mm). [lx], 1010, [2], 2. In-text illustrations throughout. Attractive and clean red cloth and buckram binding; slight tonal difference at the spine from spine label removal. A few scattered institutional stamps within; light. Tightly and very solidly bound. Includes original wrap from July 3, 1948 issue bound in. Title page toned with repair, otherwise bright and clean throughout.

Price: $500.00