Absence of Ferromagnetism or Antiferromagnetism in One- or Two-Dimensional Isotropic Heisenberg Models (pp. 1133-1136) WITH Erratum: Absence of Ferromagnetism or Antiferromagnetism in One- or Two-Dimensional Isotropic Heisenberg Models (pp. 1307-1308), in Physical Review Letters, 17, Issues 22 and 26, 28 November 1966 and 26 December 1966. N. D. Mermin, H. Wagner, David, Herbert.

Absence of Ferromagnetism or Antiferromagnetism in One- or Two-Dimensional Isotropic Heisenberg Models (pp. 1133-1136) WITH Erratum: Absence of Ferromagnetism or Antiferromagnetism in One- or Two-Dimensional Isotropic Heisenberg Models (pp. 1307-1308), in Physical Review Letters, 17, Issues 22 and 26, 28 November 1966 and 26 December 1966

New York: The American Physical Society. FIRST EDITION IN ORIGINAL WRAPS OF THE MERMIN-WAGNER THEOREM, BOTH THE ORIGINAL PAPER AND THE SUBSEQUENT ISSUE IN WHICH AN ERRATUM (correcting typographical errors) TO THE PAPER WAS PUBLISHED. Once referred to as “An Exact Monte Carlo Algorithm for Quantum Spin Systems”, Mermin and Wagner “rigorously prove that at any nonzero temperature, a one- or two-dimensional isotropic spin-S Heisenberg model with finite-range exchange interaction can be neither ferromagnetic nor antiferromagnetic. The method of proof is capable of excluding a variety of types of ordering in one and two dimensions” (Vassiliev, Scientific Reports, Jan. 2017; Mermin & Wagner, 1966).

“The Mermin-Wagner [also known as Mermin–Wagner–Hohenberg theorem, No-Go Theorem, Mermin–Wagner–Berezinskii theorem, or Coleman theorem] theorem exemplifies the crucial influence of both the dynamical symmetry and the spatial dimensionality on thermal phase transitions in many-body systems. It says: At finite temperatures, the quantum spin-S Heisenberg model with isotropic and finite-range exchange interactions on one- or two-dimensional lattices can be neither ferro- nor antiferromagnetic” (Wagner & Schollwoeck, Scholarpedia).

Wagner was one of Heisenberg’s last students; as well, he is considered the father of an entire generation of statistical physicists (Wikipedia). David Mermin is a solid state physicist best known for the “eponymous Mermin–Wagner theorem, his application of the term "Boojum" to superfluidity, and for the quote "shut up and calculate!" (in the context of the interpretation of quantum mechanics)” (Wikipedia). Item #942

CONDITION & DETAILS: New York: The American Physical Society. Two complete issues in original wraps with the address label of the physicist David Kaplan on the rear wrap; his name is stamped in the upper corner of the front wrap. 4to (10.5 x 8 inches; 263 x 200mm). The ‘erratum’ issue is toned around the edges of the front wrap. Apart from this, the issues bright and clean inside and out. Very good condition.

Price: $300.00