Nobel Lectures in Physics WITH Deep inelastic scattering: The early years [Taylor, pp. 573-595] WITH Deep inelastic scattering: Experiments on the proton and the observation of scaling [Kendall, pp. 597-614]; Deep inelastic scattering: Comparisons with the quark model [Friedman, pp. 615-628] in Reviews of Modern Physics, Vol. 63, No. 3, July 1991. Jerome I. Friedman, Henry W. Kendall, Richard E. Taylor.
Nobel Lectures in Physics WITH Deep inelastic scattering: The early years [Taylor, pp. 573-595] WITH Deep inelastic scattering: Experiments on the proton and the observation of scaling [Kendall, pp. 597-614]; Deep inelastic scattering: Comparisons with the quark model [Friedman, pp. 615-628] in Reviews of Modern Physics, Vol. 63, No. 3, July 1991
Nobel Lectures in Physics WITH Deep inelastic scattering: The early years [Taylor, pp. 573-595] WITH Deep inelastic scattering: Experiments on the proton and the observation of scaling [Kendall, pp. 597-614]; Deep inelastic scattering: Comparisons with the quark model [Friedman, pp. 615-628] in Reviews of Modern Physics, Vol. 63, No. 3, July 1991

Nobel Lectures in Physics WITH Deep inelastic scattering: The early years [Taylor, pp. 573-595] WITH Deep inelastic scattering: Experiments on the proton and the observation of scaling [Kendall, pp. 597-614]; Deep inelastic scattering: Comparisons with the quark model [Friedman, pp. 615-628] in Reviews of Modern Physics, Vol. 63, No. 3, July 1991

Lancaster: American Physical Society, 1991. 1st Edition. FIRST EDITION IN ORIGINAL WRAPS OF A SPECIAL 1991 ISSUE OF REVIEWS OF MODERN PHYSICS INCLUSIVE OF THE NOBEL PRIZE WINNING PAPERS OF THE THREE PHYSICISTS AWARDED THE 1990 NOBEL PRIZE IN PHYSICS. EACH PAPER IS SIGNED BY THE AUTHOR.

The 1990 prize was awarded to Jerome I. Friedman, Henry W. Kendall, both of the Massachusetts Institute of Technology (MIT), and Richard E. Taylor, of the Stanford Linear Accelerator Center (SLAC), "for their pioneering investigations concerning deep inelastic scattering of electrons on protons and bound neutrons, which have been of essential importance for the development of the quark model in particle physics” (Nobel Prize Committee). Their work provided a profound and lasting “breakthrough in our understanding of the structure of matter” (ibid).

“The three prizewinners were key persons in a research team which in a series of investigations found clear signs that there exists an inner structure in the protons and neutrons of the atomic nucleus. What has become known as the "SLAC-MIT experiment" paved the way for further investigations of the innermost structures of matter. Ever since the beginning of this century, researchers have studied the inner structure of atoms. Our knowledge has increased successively, among other ways through the discovery (around 1910-1930) of the nucleus of the atom and its nucleons. During the 1950s there arrived on the scene a large number of what were termed hadrons, whose properties resembled those of nucleons. To reduce these to order, the concept of quarks was introduced, at the beginning of the 1960s. Yet it was impossible to see any traces of quarks in nature until the SLAG-MIT experiment itself.

“The discovery was made when protons and neutrons were illuminated with beams from a giant "electron microscope" - a two-mile-long accelerator at SLAC in California, USA. The inner structure was interpreted to mean that quarks form the fundamental building blocks of protons and neutrons. The electrically neutral "glue" binding the quarks together is called gluons. All matter on earth, including our human bodies, consists to more than 99% of quarks with associated gluons. The little that remains is electrons” (Nobel Prize Press Release). Item #975

CONDITION & DETAILS: Lancaster: American Physical Society. Vol. 63, No. 3, July 1991. Original printed wraps. (10.5 x 8 inches; 263 x 200mm). This is not an ex-institutional copy. As noted, each paper is signed by its Nobel Prize winning author. Near fine condition inside and out.

Price: $900.00